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Whats Missing?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Prime, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    depends where you source your wood from, not all fire wood has to be cut from trees, there is a heck of a lot of scrap wood out there, which under normal circumstances is shredded and recycled, but post shtf would not be. think outside the box.
     
  2. Prime

    Prime Well-Known Member

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    Sorry but you are still the one at fault.

    If the Tree collapsed unexpectedly then you probably shouldn't have attempted to drop it yourself as you lacked the knowledge to read it. Again if you hired it YOU should have been comfortable with your ability to utilize it safely.
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    never said it wasn't my fault, what made you think otherwise?
    for this reason I will never touch a chainsaw again, in a post shtf landscape the availability of fuel for same will be a case of diminishing returns, and because of the noise factor this will not be part of my plans.
    I have for some years now been accumulating a store of hand tools for use post apocalypse.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2017
  4. Phil

    Phil Member

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    As already stated there is an enormous amount of downed wood available,just needs cutting into log sized pieces.
    On Sunday passed a farm wood yard,must have had several hundred tons of wood all neatly stacked in long rows,but all about 8-10 feet long.Now I could get the pieces down to ground level without too much difficulty,but sawing them up,I'd prefer a chain saw to a bow saw.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    I read somewhere that thieves are very good at stealing cut firewood but if you leave it uncut in long lengths they leave it alone, too much hard work apparently!:lol:
    there is a lot of stacked logs on farms around here too but I'd never be able to shift it without access to a forklift or a tractor, too big and too heavy. scrap wood is much easier to find and easier to move, why make life any harder for yourself than you have to?
    survival is all about problem solving, the most obvious answer is not necessarily the best one.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2017
  6. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    I have been and stocked up on two new chains,oil and two stroke oil.When I fill the motor,I will fill my 5 gallon can with petrol too.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    how long does that last on average?
     
  8. Phil

    Phil Member

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    Strangely most farms have a tractor or two,they also have the lifting accessories to move wood and other heavy objects.If not then ropes and pulleys will do the job.
    Thieves have got to get to the sawn logs,I don't intend to make that easy for them to accomplish.
     
  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    they wont steal uncut tree trunks they cant move, but they will steal cut timber someone has helpfully cut and stacked ready for seasoning thus making it easier to remove.
     
  10. Phil

    Phil Member

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    Not if they don't have access and no transport to take them away.
    They are likely to be the first to run out of fuel,as they don't think ahead and let their tanks get to empty before refilling.
     
  11. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    That will last a couple of years easily.I use Stihl chainsaws which are tough and reliable.Even so,I carry a spare bar too.
     
  12. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    Going on with what's missing.Just been and shut the greenhouses and polytunnel for the night.Two things to stock up on are horticultural fleece ( I have plenty and it can be re used for at least two seasons when kept in the dark)and paraffin for the heaters.I am just getting to the end of 20 gallons I bought 14 years ago from a garage that was closing down ,and they sold it from the pump.I don't use a lot ,but it keeps the frost off of vulnerable crops.
     
  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't think I've seen a greenhouse heater for years, I know people who used them in their garages to keep the car from freezing over......a long, long time ago!!
     
  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    sorry to be persistent, you said 5 litres of fuel, that's not going to last long, your going to need more than that if you want to use a chainsaw for any length of time, and you'll probably need some stabiliser fluid if you want it to last more than 6-12 months.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2017
  15. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    If you read back,I said 5 GALLONS.Regarding stabiliser,I don't bother.I have generators too,and some of the fuel is 3 years old.I store it in a cool dark place in proper containers and I have NEVER had problems.In fact I have just cycled half a gallon of two year old fuel out of the big gennie to put into the chainsaw fuel.It gets used quicker.
     
  16. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    All my allotment mates use them.In fact my daughter works in a garden centre, and she tells me they still sell loads of em. Mine is an old Eltex quadruple burner.Only ever need two of them though,and its very economical.What's more,the hardware shop in the next village sells wicks of every size you can imagine,and they SELL them!
     
  17. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    ok so i misread litres for gallons, sorry about that, however better heads than mine say that , on average, petrol lasts about 6-9 months, diesel a bit longer 12 months or so, without stabiliser they tend to go a bit sticky and will gum up the jets and intakes in a vehicle engine, don't know about jennies or chainsaws don't have experience of those, don't use them and wont be using them, wont have much use for fuel after about a couple of months post SHTF.
     
  18. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    Gennies are for short term use only..They are not long term at all,as you say,fuel will be short in a crisis. The chainsaws are crude two strokes and run easily on older petrol.
     
  19. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    okay, at least you've got your plan in place.
     
  20. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    Some chainsaw engines are trickier then others, my Jonsered will run on old fuel but my stihl runs badly if it isn't freshly mixed. Since they're expensive professional kit I try to look after them. I don't want them letting me down at the wrong moment. There is nothing crude about them.
    The sthil saws run on super unleaded mixed 50:1 but you can buy a very stable pre mixed Stihl fuel with a 3 year shelf life if you're absolutely made of money.
    I fell, sned and cut a tree into rounds ready to split in one operation. I try to split oak the same day before it hardens up. I store my wood for around 2 years before using it. Our house runs on wood.